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And he gave it for his opinion, that whoever could make two ears of corn, or two blades of grass, to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country, than the whole race of politicians put together.
Jonathan Swift

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Special Thanks Go To

I would like to thank the following persons for sending usefull information/bug reports. (in no particular order):

Matthew Clark (EamonNag WebMaster), Greg Boettcher, Peter Mattssons, David Whyld, A Ninny, and of course all the anonymous Beta-Testers!

Thanks also to everyone that sent an email without saying their names (which are quite few... you silly you) ;)

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2022-08-12 23:24

IFReviews Dictionary

Art
- The second person singular, indicative mode, present tense, of the substantive verb Be; but formed after the analogy of the plural are, with the ending -t, as in thou shalt, wilt, orig. an ending of the second person sing. pret. Cf. Be. Now used only in solemn or poetical style.
- The employment of means to accomplish some desired end; the adaptation of things in the natural world to the uses of life; the application of knowledge or power to practical purposes.
- A system of rules serving to facilitate the performance of certain actions; a system of principles and rules for attaining a desired end; method of doing well some special work; -- often contradistinguished from science or speculative principles; as, the art of building or engraving; the art of war; the art of navigation.
- The systematic application of knowledge or skill in effecting a desired result. Also, an occupation or business requiring such knowledge or skill.
- The application of skill to the production of the beautiful by imitation or design, or an occupation in which skill is so employed, as in painting and sculpture; one of the fine arts; as, he prefers art to literature.
- Those branches of learning which are taught in the academical course of colleges; as, master of arts.
- Learning; study; applied knowledge, science, or letters.
- Skill, dexterity, or the power of performing certain actions, acquired by experience, study, or observation; knack; as, a man has the art of managing his business to advantage.
- Skillful plan; device.
- Cunning; artifice; craft.
- The black art; magic.


Choose Your Own Romance

    Author
    David Dyte

    Idiom
    English

    Authoring System
    Inform6

    Release Year
    2002

    IFR Overall Rating
    4 Stars IFR Overall Rating

IFReviews

    4 Stars IFReview Rating 2006-08-01 08:35 Emily Short